Twin Cities in Motion

5K Training from Mayo Clinic

posted on Thu, Jul 18 2013 1:19 pm by Mayo Clinic

Often a 5K is considered a gateway race for many people – opening doors to other distance races. Training for a 5K provides a goal for your exercise program and a new challenge. Training, running and finishing the race exciting for a new runner and a 5K is great beginner distance for a non-runner. Mayo Clinic is here to help you ease into the training with a 7-Week program. This 5K run training schedule was created by Olympian Jeff Galloway. It's tailored for beginners or anyone who wants to complete a 5K race.

This 5K training schedule incorporates a mix of running, walking and resting. The goal is to slowly increase your running time to help your body ease into it – many people start off running too fast and are quickly turned off by running because their bodies have not adjusted to the motions. This combination of running, walking and resting will help reduce the risk of injury, stress and fatigue, while boosting your enjoyment of physical activity.

Remember, you can run or walk slowly to help your body adjust to this 5K training schedule. Focus on finishing the workout or race and not the speed you are doing it at. In two months, you will be 5K race ready!

Click here to download the Mayo Clinic 5K training schedule

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Mayo Clinic submissions to Mile Marker are reviewed by the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center team. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center treats sports and activity related injuries, creates customized exercise programs and provides preventive care for athletes of all levels. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/sportsmedcenter-rst/.

Mayo Clinic is a proud sponsor of the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. More than 3,700 physicians, scientists and researchers, and 50,100 allied health staff work at Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn; Jacksonville, Fla; and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa.